$1,295

I Just Want
Cremation

  • We Bring Your Loved One Into Our Care
  • All Necessary Paperwork
  • Online Obituary
  • Cremation
  • Plastic Urn

$1,528

Simple Cremation Package

  • We Bring Your Loved One Into Our Care
  • All Necessary Paperwork
  • Five Certified Copies Of Death Certificate
  • Cremation
  • $175 Urn Allowance
  • Online Obituary

$1,820

Cremation with Memorial Service

  • We Bring Your Loved One Into Our Care
  • All Necessary Paperwork
  • Use Of Chapel For Memorial Service
  • Cremation
  • Plastic Urn
  • Online Obituary

$1,875

Cape Girardeau Cremation

  • We Bring Your Loved One Into Our Care
  • All Necessary Paperwork
  • Five Certified Copies Of Death Certificate
  • Cremation
  • Container for Ashes
  • Delivery of Ashes
  • Online Obituary

$3,275

Simple Cremation With Viewing

  • We Bring Your Loved One Into Our Care
  • All Necessary Paperwork
  • Five Certified Copies Of Death Certificate
  • Embalming
  • Cloth Covered Casket
  • Use Of Chapel For Two Hours
  • Cremation
  • $175 Urn Allowance

$3,475

Traditional Funeral With Cremation

  • We Bring Your Loved One Into Our Care
  • All Necessary Paperwork
  • Five Certified Copies Of Death Certificate
  • Embalming
  • User of Metal Or Wood Rental Casket
  • Use Of Chapel For Three Hours
  • Cremation
  • $175 Urn Allowance

Cremation Service in St. Peters, St. Louis and Surrounding Area

Have Questions or Need Immediate Assistance?

Call Us Today.

 

General Price List

Downtown
2135 Chouteau Ave
St. Louis, MO 63103
(314) 241-8844

West County
14374 Manchester Rd
Ballwin, MO 63011
(636) 227-4488

Florissant
5 Saint Anthony Ln
Florissant, MO 63031
(314) 924-4488

St. Charles County
320 Jungermann Rd.,
St. Peters, MO 63376
(636) 484-8844

*This is not a General Price List (GPL). For a full GPL that accommodates a wide range of customized choices, please contact us directly. Plan ahead your future as St. Louis Cremation and funeral homes is happy to call you or schedule a tour for personal attention.

A Guide to the Cremation Process

The cremation process is a subject that many people are interested in, but few know much about. The cremation process can be divided into six steps: identification, authorization, cremating the body, finalizing the remains, and transferring the ashes. St. Louis Cremation strives to educate you on this very personal topic so that you can make informed decisions about what happens to your loved ones after death.

Cremation is the reduction of a body to bone fragments using high heat and flame. The cremation chamber, or retort, must reach temperatures between 1600°F (426°C) & 1800° F (980°C). This can take two hours or more depending on how big or small the deceased person is.  The cremated ashes are the results of cremation. They are usually a gray color and resemble coarse beach sand in texture.

Cremating a body is not illegal in any state, but each state has its own regulations regarding cremations. For example, in Illinois, someone must witness the cremation and sign an affidavit stating that the cremation has taken place.

Step 1: Identifying the deceased

It is important to first identify the deceased before the cremation process can begin. This is done by checking first for a hospital wrist band attached to the patient at or before the time of death. If for any reason and identification bracelet was not assigned to the patient, any tattoos, scars, or other identifying marks on the body. If there are no visible markings, dental records or a DNA sample may be needed to identify the deceased.

Identification differs from state to state but usually, a family member is present to validate the dead body. A tag is then placed on the body for the funeral home's identification

Step 2: Getting Authorized

The funeral home must get the necessary permission to move forward with the cremation.  This is usually granted by crematorium staff or in the cremation authorization form. If no cremation authorizations are present, it may be possible to get cremated without one but this varies state-by-state and can vary based on which funeral home you work with.

Once the crematory has received all necessary documents, the process can then move on to the next step.

Step 3: Preparation of the body

The body is prepared for cremation by removing all metal objects that could cause damage to the crematorium. This includes jewelry, eyeglasses, and any other metal items on or in the body. Medical devices and prosthetics are also removed that may cause a reaction with the cremation process.

Step 4: Cremation

After preparation is complete, the body is then moved into the cremation chamber or retort.  At this stage, crematories differ slightly in how they process the cremation. The body is then exposed to high temperatures up to 1800° F (980°C)  for about two hours, though some cremation may take longer. Then there is a cooling period before the remains can be handled.

Step 5: Finalizing the remains

The cremated remains (cremains) are then swept out of the cremation chamber and processed into a fine powder. The bones and ash are separated any metal implants or objects such as dental fillings are removed. Any metals found are sent for recycling and the bones goes through a special processor to be grinded  into ashes.

Step 6: Placing the ashes into an urn

The cremains are placed in an urn, which can be made of a variety of materials. Urns can also be personalized with engravings or designs. Typically the funeral home provides a free container for the ashes but it is recommended that the family provide an urn of their choice so as to commemorate their loved one.

Do you have clothes on when you are cremated?

The cremation process does not require removal of clothing. Most people are cremated in what they arrive to the funeral home wearing.  However, if the deceased has certain religious beliefs that require specific items to be cremated with them, those items will be accommodated.  Cremation allows you to be fully dressed as long as your family requested it.

Please call us at  (314) 241-8844 for more information about the cremation process.

 

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